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Allergy issues in school

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Allergy issues in school

A health expert has questioned a school's decision to ban conkers in case pupils were allergic to them.

The ban at Ivy Lane Primary in Chippenham, Wiltshire, was introduced over fears the horse chestnuts could trigger anaphylactic reactions. Bookwell Primary School in west Cumbria and Menstrie Primary school in Clackmannanshire also imposed bans because some children there suffer from nut allergies.

Nut-related allergies can result in respiratory problems and even death, however this is usually from eating nuts. But Hazel Gowland, of the Anaphylaxis Campaign, said a "common sense approach" would have been much better than a ban.

For Full story see BBC Education 7th Oct 2004

Knee-jerk reactions send confusing messages to children in schools. A more considered and informed decision would be better all round. Via the Internet, it is quite simple and quick, to find out ‘the facts’ and not only safeguard pupils, but also inform parents of the potential problems, if indeed the threat is real.

JC

“The number of children at risk of severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) appears to be rising. Peanut allergy alone affects one in 70 children across the UK, and there has also been a significant rise in the number who are allergic to other foods and substances - such as milk, eggs, fish, kiwi fruit, latex and insect stings.”

For futher details see The Anaphylaxis campaign Website

 
 
 

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